Spotting Bald Eagles Becoming More Common

Spotting Bald Eagles Becoming More Common

Bald eagles are indeed making a comeback. Our national symbol was officially taken off the endangered species list in 2007. Officials now believe there are nearly 10,000 nesting pairs of this bird, and this number does not include those that have not reached sexual maturity. Since bald eagles can live up to 30 years in the wild, this means we are likely to see an upswing in population numbers for some time to come.

These birds are now found in Alaska as well as every state in the Lower 48. Of all these states, they are most often spotted in Alaska. Throughout the rest of the country, these birds do not seem to be concentrated in any particular region. The exception to this is along the northern section of the Mississippi river. As such, bald eagles are plentiful in Minnesota and Wisconsin; however they are also found in great numbers in Florida.

The Haines River in Alaska is one of the most prevalent areas for spotting bald eagles. In late fall through early winter, there are thousands of salmon swimming upstream in this river. Bald eagles gather along the banks of the Haines River in an effort to catch these swimming salmon. In fact, the Alaska Chilkat Eagle Preserve has been set aside especially for the conservation of these special birds.

If you’d like to see if eagles have been spotted in your area, you can go to: http://www.baldeagleinfo.com/eagle/eagle1.html. Here you can click on a link to information about sightings by state. In the event you are fortunate enough to encounter a bald eagle, you can also share this information with other bird lovers by posting your sighting information here.